Hey, teachers and parents. Hints and tips
after the story. Oh, ha, amazing. Hey Steve! Can you help me
please? Not now Maggie. I am watching a great TV programme. About wild animals. Hmmmm.
Ok then. Let’s have some fun with a little Maggie magic. Haha. Abracadabra.
Shu, go away. Eeeee. That didn’t taste good. EEe. What
happened? My tongue was really much longer and bigger than this. Hey, show me your tongue.
EEEEee. EE. Well done. Oh, look an elephant. Hooho. That
elephant has got bigger ears than me. Oh, it must be fantastic to have really big ears.
You can hear everything. Abracadabra. Oh hey… My ears are getting bigger. And bigger. Oh,
I can hear everything. It’s too loud. Psss. Oh, stop! STOP!
Oh, oh. That’s better. Hey, my ears were really big. Show me your ears. Make them bigger
and bigger – ears, yeah. This is so crazy. It must be Maggie magic. Oh, where is that
naughty, naughty bird. Oh, ou. Look at that monkey. It’s got really
big eyes. Abracadabra. Oh, hey look at my eyes. They’re getting bigger and bigger
and bigger. Hey! What are they? They are eyes, they are eyes, they are eyes. Say it with
me. What are they? They are eyes, they are eyes, they are eyes. And again what are they?
They are eyes, they are eyes, they are eyes. Oh, but hey. I can see everything. Wow. Oh,
and I can see Maggie. Maggie, I can see you. I am here. Ouuu. Oh no, Maggie. My eyes, my
eyes, my eyes. Oh, Maggie, you naughty bird. Sorry Steve. But it’s good fun. It’s good
fun for you. Oh look, another elephant. Oh, not an elephant again. Abracadabra. OOOOOoo.
My nose is getting bigger and bigger. Ou, but hey, I can smell something nice. What
can I smell? A flower. Be careful… Oh, a aaa AACHOO! Haha. Steve! Oh Maggie, help.
HELP! Haha. Maggie. Wow, you can fly. So, fly Steve, fly. Oh Maggie,
I can’t fly. Look, I’ve got arms. I’ve got hands. And look, I’ve got fingers. I
haven’t got wings. Ok, abracadabra. WOW! Hee hey. I can fly. I can fly. This is amazing.
Wow! Hey. Maggie, I can’t touch anything. Because
I haven’t got any fingers. How can I eat? Eat like me. Eat like you? Ok. Haha.
Hey, what a crazy clip. Hi there. This clip came from the Wow! Orange book and it’s
from a unit about the senses. So this video quickly reviews the body parts important for
the senses – such as eyes, that are used to see and ears to hear etc. And it passively
introduces the verbs to see, to hear to touch, to taste and to smell. If your child uses
the Wow! Orange book then they had a homework task. And it looks like this. The task is
to simply watch this video story and number the pictures as they appear. Whou, and there’s
also a great colourful worksheet for teachers to use in class, which practises the new language
together with the grammar from previous unit. Simple comparatives. So as you can see, the
sentence here reads “The zebra’s ears are bigger than my ears”. But hey, as we’re
looking as senses, I would like to remind you, that it’s important to remember all
five senses, when teaching English to young learners. Children can vary greatly and can
respond better to different sensory input. And it’s quite often that we concentrate
on what we can see and hear in the classroom. But we forget the other three. Multisensory
learning incorporates numerous senses in order to better stimulate brain. To help learners
retain more information and to engage all the children regardless of their learning
style. This way of teaching can also inject a lot of fun into the classroom. Why not try
play blindfold taste or smelling bottles or the activity feely bag. It’s a great game
to let all those senses run wild. For more information, see the WattsEnglish gamebank
or the teacher’s book. Thanks for watching and please like and subscribe and I’ll see
you next time. By for now. Bye, bye.